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Today’s News - Wednesday, February 6, 2019

●  Buday explains why he "wrote a short story about shitty architects" and seeks female collaborators to expand the story: "The #MeToo movement is cooling - and that's a problem. Sexism grows unseen and unchecked in the dark - architecture's #MeToo moment seeing the light of day again shouldn't be left to fate."

●  Geographer Dash Nelson explains that, rather than trying to change NIMBYs to YIMBYs, "the part of the NIMBY acronym that deserves the most scrutiny" is the "BY" (back yard) for its "geographic small-mindedness."

●  Anderton talks to those involved in the 1.3-mile Destination Crenshaw, a new "public art spectacle" in L.A.:"The project lands at a time of great change for the area - and with it anxiety - could it be a Trojan horse for gentrification?"

●  More details about - and images of - Destination Crenshaw - planners say that the "open-air museum will offset the effects of gentrification and revitalize the vibrant heart of black Los Angeles" - it "won't combat gentrification, but it will instill a deep sense of community pride."

●  In Toronto, there's rising concern over plans to redevelop Zeidler's 1971 Ontario Place, with an online petition "calling to preserve it with much of its existing structures. The park is one of the most 'striking and culturally significant' works of modernist architecture in the city."

●  O'Sullivan, on a brighter note, brings us news that the "famously stringent parks and gardens" of Paris "will finally let you have a little fun - games, picnics, and dogs are finally getting a warmer welcome" (and a "ban of mixing kids and dogs may end up being relaxed, once people see that allowing pooches into parks doesn't end in chaos").

●  P+W's Kulig takes a deep dive into the six new stations along the $3.2-billion Toronto-York Spadina Subway Extension to see whether the line is "delivering on its promise of dignified mobility for all - the successes and shortfalls of the project offer many lessons for designers and politicians alike."

●  Wainwright gets a personal tour of "a surreal replica" of Palladio's Villa La Rotunda built atop a hill in Palestine - an "opulent wonder-world of excess - a world of peacocks and gazelles wandering between the Roman amphitheatre and Andalusian pools" filled with priceless treasures (ya gotta read/see this!).

●  Thorpe cheers Foster's Norton Museum expansion in West Palm Beach: "Only 8% is new building - instead of a reinvention, the design enabled the museum to become a much better version of its original self" (lots of pix, too).

●  "Rising architect" Farshid Moussavi is tapped to design the first U.S. cultural center for Ismaili Muslims in Houston (beating finalists including Chipperfield, Gang, and Koolhaas). "The building will occupy less space than the landscaping" by Nelson Byrd Woltz (alas, no images - yet).

●  Arad and Walker return to Ground Zero to design a Memorial Glade "that will honor those affected by 9/11-related illnesses."

●  The U.S. Congress might (finally!) do some good - it "may follow architects' lead in constructing bird-safe buildings" with the bipartisan Bird-Safe Buildings Act (should we hold our breath?!!?).

●  Architectural historian Tolbert's "Queens Modern" project "documents the overlooked postwar buildings of Queens - 61% of all buildings constructed in New York City from 1930 to 1943 were in Queens," but have been largely ignored since.

●  Dowdy considers Poland's architecture scene that "is evolving from brutalism to brand new - history and politics are played out in architecture - it's all there in the built environment. Many architects bemoan the lack of urban planning and zoning. But among the chaos are gems of good design in Warsaw and beyond."

●  Kastner parses J.B. Jackson's 1976 essay "The Domestication of the Garage" that "displays his rare ability to combine deep erudition with eloquent and plainspoken analysis" (both are great essays!).

●  The U.K's BDP acquires Toronto-based Quadrangle as "part of a strategy to grow its workload in North America" - the Toronto staff 200 "will continue to operate under the Quadrangle brand."


  

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