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Today’s News - Tuesday, March 21, 2017

•   A very sad way to start the day: Dunlap poetically ponders the passing of Hugh Hardy, "who lent pizzazz" and "showmanship" to New York Landmarks; to us, he was an architect's architect, a journalist's dream interview: "In a profession that frequently takes itself too seriously, Hugh sparkled with wit," sayeth Stern.

•   A round-up of some of Hardy's ("the beloved architect") most notable works.

•   Trump just keeps on tromping: Budds bemoans that his budget proposal "is an assault on America's creative soul" by cutting the NEA and NEH. "It's petty, political, and dangerous."

•   Menking says that cutting the NEA, NEH, PBS, etc. "will directly affect architects both in practice and academia" - and asks you to "share your stories on how these organizations helped architecture, art, and design."

•   Also on board: the AIA "slams Trump budget" with massive cuts to the EPA and NEA, "which threaten efforts to address urban growth, community development, and sustainability."

•   Schumacher is working on a new part-social, part-private housing prototype for a London council estate, and (gasp!) seemingly "quite happy working with the social component there."

•   Foley offers a fascinating look at Detroit's planning department and Cox and Lewis, the "architects behind the city's next act - convincing longtime Detroiters to not only buy into the new map, but help draw it."

•   Quirk has a great Q&A with the team behind "Footwork" at the Saint-Étienne design biennial in France that "highlights Detroit-based partnerships that have produced truly innovative projects."

•   Dickinson's great take on how New Haven "is putting its money where its Modernism is," creating "a new branch of the Historic Preservation movement. The irony is that 'Modern' is deemed to be 'Historic.'"

•   A new Niemeyer will sit atop a 19th-century factory in Leipzig - a (very cool!) concrete-and-glass sphere to house a restaurant and bar.

•   Hénault cheers Patkau Architects' Audain Art Museum in Whistler, B.C., that also puts "its forested site on display" (and saved all but one tree): "one senses both the confidence of the firm's impressive body of work, but also a new dimension that has come from their recent experiments."

•   HOK's high-rise "stands out eccentrically against Abu Dhabi's urban landscape - motivated by the attitude 'less is more'" - until it comes to height, where "perhaps 'more is more.'"

•   Finch saw a bit too much chasing the money men at MIPIM, and "why you shouldn't always follow"; but "there were rays of light in Cannes to reverse the private sector race to the bottom."

•   Kuma tells Hong Kong architects that working within constraints is "no excuse not to come up with creative and eye-catching designs. We are no free men. In the world of architectural design, freedom does not exist."

•   Grimshaw's Middleton minces no words about open design competitions that "devalue the architectural profession. It's time to take a stand to hold our own work at a higher value. Only then will clients begin to do the same."

•   Speaking of open competitions: bunches of international types entered for a chance to design a dining hall at the University of Cambridge; the winner and shortlist are all home-grown talents (lots of pix).

•   Call for entries deadline reminders: 2017 Buckminster Fuller Challenge + Building Voices International Design Competition for prototypes for innovative built environments and systems-focused solutions in Hawai'i.

•   Help Wanted: The J. Max Bond Architecture Center for a Just City is seeking a new Director.



  


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