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Today’s News - Tuesday, October 29, 2013

•   Reflecting on Superstorm Sandy one year later, Hanscom looks into "green infrastructure" and why "engineers say that's a bunch of baloney."

•   While green infrastructure may sound like "a warm and fuzzy thing, natural features are, at best, an uncertain solution."

•   Beck delves into how NYC's "rebuilding and resiliency efforts stack up - a number of the most noteworthy programs are all but stalled."

•   Seven seasoned architects talk about how to safeguard cities against the next Hurricane Sandy.

•   Eyefuls of a beautiful bamboo house designed by a Hanoi-based firm as "a prototype house to keep inhabitants safe from floods, rainstorms, and more."

•   Outram minces no words about why she is a former architect: "Dear architects, You're outdated. You don't listen to people. No wonder architecture has become a niche vocation."

•   Benfield agrees, but only somewhat: the most interesting question is not whether architects have "lost touch," but rather "does an architect have an ethical duty to the public?"

•   Jones takes Bansky to task for his fake NYT op-ed claiming 1WTC is "a fearful building" that "proves that terrorism has won": it's people, not buildings, that make a city: "He wouldn't say that if he'd been there in the months after the attacks. It was simply astonishing to experience the wounded city's irrepressible joy."

•   Lamster cheers an "audacious new proposal" to take down an elevated highway dividing Dallas whose "effects on its immediate surroundings have been brutal" - if it comes down, the city "will be in a position to recast itself as a home to the kind of walkable, high-density urbanism that is driving city growth around the globe."

•   Las Vegas may have "embraced a higher-density urban lifestyle," but things aren't going quite as planners had hoped in the 'burbs, where a gas station/convenience store won out over a more urban multistory development.

•   Hadid tapped to design the Documentation Center of Cambodia - Cambodians were invited to submit, but "they were 'not up to standard.'"

•   Mecanoo's Houben talks about the Library of Birmingham: "Libraries are the cathedrals of these times"; and how being a woman makes a difference as an architect: "I think more intuitively, more personally. Sometimes the men don't like it."

•   A Texan has big plans to transform Detroit's crumbling Packard Plant into a manufacturing plant for modular homes and offices.

•   Pokharel reports on a gathering of Asian architects in Nepal "to deliberate the twin themes of spirituality and city image building" to create "a better vision for built environment in future - a vision which enables to move forward duly looking back."

•   Some notable industry experts nominate an impressive list of who they think future historians will consider today's greatest inventors.

•   The newly-established China Lewis Mumford Research Center may seem "stranger than fiction," but its leaders think otherwise: "Time will tell what effect the center will have on urbanism in Shanghai and beyond."

•   One we couldn't resist: eyefuls of the largest land art in the U.K.: "The monumental mug spans 11 acres in a field in Belfast's Titanic Quarter" (amazing!!!!).

•   Call for entries: IMOA Atacama 2014 International Architecture & Design Student Competition: International Museum of Astronomy.



  


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